A TASTE FROM “THROUGH KESTREL’S EYES”

 

 

 

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https://yvonnehertzberger.wordpress.com/teaser-prologue-to-through-kestrels-eyes

PROLOGUE:

 

Eleven year old Liannis sat on the sod roof of her parents’ cottage in her night-shift, stroking No-tail’s soft fur, and gazing into the night sky. She loved to sit here to think, but chose to do so only after she was sure her parents slept soundly below. They did not approve, fearing she might fall off and be injured. Liannis knew better. At times like this, No-tail, their small cat, usually followed her and took advantage of the warm nest made by the hammock of her skirt as she sat cross-legged.

As a small child, Liannis had spent many happy days at court playing with Lionn, Lord Gaelen’s son, Sennia, his sister, and Borless, the son of Lady Marja’s maid. But as she grew older, the press of her growing inner gifts made it harder to be among so many people. The impressions of their emotions pressed on her spirit and threatened to overwhelm her. Like Liethis, seer to the court of Bargia, she preferred the isolation of her home outside the city.

At first Lord Gaelen and Lady Marja had been reluctant to have their son and heir come to the cottage to visit with her here, fearing for his safety away from the guards. But Liannis knew he would come to no harm. She told them, with full confidence that nothing would happen to him as long as he was with her. Earth had told her so.

Gaelen had relented only upon assurance from Liethis, official seer of Bargia, that Liannis’ sight was true.  From that time on, under the watchful eyes of Liannis’ parents, the three children had visited with her often,. They had occasionally accompanied her in her night vigils on the roof.

Liannis had not returned to court again after her eighth summer. The press of impressions there caused her too much pain.

Tonight, Liannis kept her vigil alone. She considered what her future would hold. When she reached her twelfth birthday, she understood she would start spending the winter months with Liethis as her apprentice.

Liethis had already explained to Lord Gaelen and her parents that Liannis would grow into a much more powerful seer than she was. Liannis’ gifts of truth-reading and her ability to mind-speak birds and animals already outshone her own and had not yet grown into their full strength. But the girl needed other skills that would help her use her gifts to their full potential; how to dampen the press that would drive her mad otherwise, how to deal with persons of influence diplomatically and how to handle unwelcome questions from those whose problems were too small for Earth to be concerned with.

Liannis did not look forward to leaving her peaceful home but she understood its necessity. Already, she found it hard to control the barrage that assaulted her senses, and this would only increase. But at least the summers would still be spent here at home.

Liannis smiled, as she sensed her father reach for her mother and lay his sleeping arm across her waist. Earth had given her special parents. She knew they would never have another child. Seers were always only daughters. Earth never burdened a seer with siblings, as they matured too quickly and felt the emotions of those around them too keenly, to thrive in larger families. They needed a serene environment in which their gifts could grow without constraint.

She dreamily pulled a blade of grass from the sod to chew. Then, stroking No-tail one last time, she smiled to herself, content, climbed down and went to her bed in the loft.

Ken La Salle – Writer, Full Steam Ahead

I have been sitting on my duff for a bit, taking a sabbatical and getting healthy. During the process of being feed grapes(I could only dream), my friend Ken has been maniacal with his writing and extended works. After Ken’s release of The Wrong Magic, he has moved forward completing his first romantic novel, Heaven Enough. His philosophical memoir on success, Climbing Maya will be e-released in April by Kal-Ba Publishing, including an afterward by Ken. And if that’s not enough a new 3rd Wall You Tube page will be available for Ken’s comedic side coming in December. Yes, he also has audio books and on March 15th, The Most Amazing Book You’ve Ever Heard in Your Entire Life will be revealed. Whew!! I am exhausted just following his news. Congratulations Ken, you never cease to amaze me.

HeavenEnough_jacket

Follow Ken’s writing career at www.kenlasalle.com On Twitter  On Facebook And, on YouTube

You can find his books on Amazon.com, BN.com, Smashwords.com, and his audiobooks at Audible.com.

And don’t forget to check out his podcasts, available on iTunes!

Climbing Maya - April 2015TMA final cover

HO HO HOLIDAY E BOOK DISCOUNTS

Start your holiday shopping season with a click. Black Friday and Cyber Monday with great discounts. Happy Holidays!

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00814YWME The Rising (The Lost Children of Managrail) Book 1

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00CHVJI0S Vanished (The Lost Children of Managrail) Book 2

Both books available for the Holidays at 99 cents

 

Honest reviews are always welcomed and appreciated.

Amazon/Drones…What?

A few minutes ago as I enjoyed my morning coffee, I heard a news piece that I found astonishing. The Zon wants permission from the FAA to fly drones. I spit my brew across the counter, not a nice sight, and attempted not to miss a word being broadcast.

It seems Amazon wants drones to fly packages (not to exceed 5 pounds in weight) and drop them on the customer’s doorstep. Now I’m not the brightest bulb on the planet, nor am I the dimmest, but this left me with little question marks floating around my head. Oh, and yes the Zon promised they wouldn’t be used to collect information…hmm?

As a writer I am grateful for the doors that Amazon has opened for me, and the possibilities of  enhancing my exposure. I am all for free enterprise, marketing, the right to choose, but I wonder how much is enough for Amazon? Everyday another bit of news is popping up involving Amazon and it gets wilder and wilder.

I’m happy with UPS and heck, USPS is fine for me too. What comes after the drones?

The Race Is On: Ken La Salle

Newsflash— “Cookies: Sluts of the Snack World”  flashed her chocolate chips distracting everyone and made a fast dash out of the gate. “Last Ditch” wasn’t to be fooled(they have the same trainer and Ditch knows the tricks).

Cookies has the lead but Ditch is coming on strong. This reporter is predicting by the weekend it will be a photo finish.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00L5HOSWS

last ditch cover

 

Follow his writing career at www.kenlasalle.com

On Twitter

On Facebook

And, on YouTube

You can find his books on Amazon.comBN.comSmashwords.com, and my audiobooks at Audible.com.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NicQhZ6TWVk&list=UUqtn0cpAy5KF5afAGSDNZhA

Sueing Amazon

I am posting an article that I read on the news this morning that I find intriguing. As an author I am my brand, therefore I can be merchandised just like electronics or any other retail product. Since I have my books on Amazon this definitely caught my interest. I think in time some author along the way will find the right lawyer and all hell will  break loose even though a previous author wasn’t successful in a suit against a reviewer.

I’d love to hear your opinions on this article and do you think this will start a new trend?

The next time you write an online review, be careful. You might get sued.

That’s what could happen to a Florida man who left a negative review about an Internet router he purchased. According to his Tuesday post on Reddit, where he’s asking for legal advice, he received a letter from a law firm in Philadelphia threatening to sue him for an “illegal campaign to damage, discredit, defame, and libel” the company that makes the router.

“Your statements are false, defamatory, libelous, and slanderous, constitute trade libel and place Mediabridge and its products in a false light,” the verbose letter from the law firm reads in part.

In his review, which has since been edited, the man made several allegations, including that many of the positive reviews about the product on Amazon might be fake and that the router itself was “identical” to a router from a different company.

If the man doesn’t take down his review within three days, cease all Internet conversation about the product, and agrees to never buy the company’s products again, the law firm will sue him, according to the letter. But by going to Reddit and not keeping quiet, the man might have already sealed his fate.

Companies, it turns out, have every right to sue people who write reviews on websites that they may feel are libelous or defamatory.

While there is a level of legal protection that third-party websites (in this case, Amazon) have from being sued, which come from Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act—the same section that protects websites that show revenge porn—the authors of those reviews are not protected.

Neither the letter nor the user can be confirmed. Still, this isn’t the first time that someone has taken legal heat for online reviews.

In 2012, a Virginia court sided with a contractor who received a negative review from a woman on Yelp, claiming defamation. The woman who wrote the review said the service was poor and accused the contractor of stealing her jewelry. She was sued for $750,000.

In 2011, a book author sued a man, though unsuccessfully, who wrote negative reviews about his book on Amazon. And in 2006, a woman in Florida won $11.3 million in a lawsuit resulting from defamatory remarks on an Internet message board.

So while Amazon states in its terms of use that sellers “may not ask buyers to remove negative reviews,” these companies do have legal protections to go after comments they may deem libelous.

While the Internet allows users a certain amount of anonymity behind reviews on Amazon or Yelp—where a negative or positive review can determine a company’s success—there is still a danger that companies will take legal action against these reviews. For this Florida man, his gripes with this company will only grow.

Guest Author Melissa Bowersock

Today my guest author is Melissa Bowersock.  I wonder if she ever sleeps. Her book trailers alone will keep you busy. Her promo page is loaded with her works, and social media sires. Please visit, you won’t be disappointed.

ex-mjb2-24-13 The Dynamism of Writing

There are a lot of things that writing is not. It’s not mechanical (or shouldn’t be; knowing the mechanics is just not enough). It’s not often governable because inspiration is not governable. It’s not a simple modular process. (Subject + verb + object = quality sentence.) It’s fluid, dynamic, protean, mutable, nebulous, and highly subjective.

I am guessing that some non-writers think it’s a simple process of jotting down all the right words in the right order, checking spelling and voila! Instant book. Not so. It’s not like there’s an absolute amount of the right words, or an absolute right order. It’s more like herding cats.

I often equate writing to building a brick wall. I write linearly, from start to finish, and as I’m writing the first few paragraphs, the first few pages, I feel as if I am laying down a foundation for a wall. Each word is a brick, carefully chosen and carefully laid in. If I don’t have the exact brick/word that I want, I stop building the wall. It’s not unheard of for me to stop writing for minutes, hours, days, waiting for the perfect word that I want to manifest in my brain. I know some writers will go ahead and put in a close substitute in order to continue writing, then go back and edit later. I don’t do that. Just imagine building that wall and say I’ve got three or five or ten courses of bricks built up. Then I go back and find there’s a brick on the bottom row that doesn’t fit right or is the wrong color. Pulling that brick out and trying to fit another one in could weaken the entire wall and would likely look like what it was—a second-thought repair. I would much rather build the wall as best as I possibly can from the start, and edit as I go. I hate to rewrite, so I do as little of that as possible.

I remember one time I was working with an editor on a book he was publishing for me and we got into a discussion of this very thing. When I told him how I worked, he said, “My God, I thought that was a myth! I have always heard of writers who work like that, but I didn’t really think they existed!” Yup, they do. At least I do. And it works for me.

So now I’m happily writing away, steering the story where I want it to go and suddenly, what the heck? That fluid dynamism raises its head again and I realize my story has been co-opted. This is often difficult for non-writers to understand, but it’s not uncommon for a story to take on a life of its own and suddenly veer off in a different direction. Going back to our wall, it’s as if I’ve laid one course of bricks just ever so slightly off center from the last course. This new layer is now 1/8″ off to one side. Without noticing the difference, I keep building, and before I know it, the whole wall is leaning. When I realize that the wall is not going where I want it to go, I then have to demolish however many layers until I get back down to the solid and straight foundation, then start building again.

But how does that happen? I’ve been asked, “You’re writing the book. How can it go a different way than the way you want it to go?” I honestly don’t know. I just know that it does. Obviously I don’t have the entire book scripted in my head; it does not exist in some fully-formed way. It evolves as I write. New ideas present themselves; new aspects to characters reveal themselves. I’ve got options for new directions, little side trips. And sometimes I’ll pick a direction and it just evolves in a way I hadn’t intended or foreseen. The good news is that this taking on a life of its own is when I know the book is truly alive, that it’s not just me mechanically putting words on a piece of paper. It’s viable, it’s growing; it’s real. The bad news is it can transform into something that I’m not expecting.

I began writing my last book, Stone’s Ghost, about a ghost that came over from England with the London Bridge when it was transported to Lake Havasu, Arizona. When I first conceived of the idea for the story, I had in mind that it would be a comedy, the ghost experiencing a light and fluffy culture shock between 18th century England and modern Arizona. Several chapters in, I realized that not only was it not going to be a comedy, it had a distinctly dark side to it. Surprised the heck out of me. And even though it’s not the story I had planned to write, it turned out great and I love it. This is one time when that leaning wall became more beautiful than the straight up-and-down plan.

Okay, so I’ve built my wall, I’ve told my story and it’s done, ready to publish. Hold on, not so fast. How do you know when it’s done? In proof-reading my stories, whether it’s my own early copy or a final galley proof, I’ve found that doneness still evades definition. I might read a paragraph that was perfectly satisfying to me when I wrote it, but now suddenly it lacks something or it feels clunky and contrived. I rewrite it, sharpen it up, cut it down. Two days later I re-read the same paragraph and decide that the way I had it to begin with worked better, so I change it back. What I’ve realized is that any story, any book, is what it is only on any given day. Any other day, depending on my mood or frame of mind, it might need to be something completely different. I could look at a book every day for a year and probably have 365 different opinions about it. Even when I re-read my already published books, I can still see places that—at that moment in time—I would change slightly. So pronouncing a book finished is a very elusive process; it can change day by day and it’s never an absolute. Only by chipping away the less than perfect parts, grinding it down by finer and finer edits until I’m finally down to moving commas do I get to the point of completion. Today.

Tomorrow all bets are off.

My Fellow Authors Promo page

http://aronjoice.com/press-room/my-fellow-author-melissa-bowersock/