Passion

I wrote this guest post about a year ago, and thought it was good place to revisit.

Passion and Writing

Do you communicate your passion in your writing? Passion in writing is the hook that draws the reader into the web of story. Here, Aron Joice, outlines how she accesses her passion and articulates it as part of her story. Enjoy!
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Passion and Writing

by Aron Joice

Aron Joice Passion and Writing post graphicWhere does passion come from and how does it affect a writer? Passion is a gripping emotion that can allow us to discover secrets about others and ourselves. I am passionate about so many things, art, our environment, animals, children, and the elderly. Each category moves me differently, but the feelings are powerful nonetheless. Writers are solitary people facing a screen for hours on end requiring self-discipline. That discipline must come from the passion, and the necessity to write. So how do we use this as a tool to enhance our prose?

“Everyone is motivated by passion in some way”

I write fantasy. When I deal with my characters personalities and flaws I think about what motivates them. Why do they behave in a certain way? They can’t be linear, or unbelievable. Even the quietest of people have some deep-seated issues. The bottom line in my trilogy “The Lost Children of Managrail” is that love can heal, but it can also destroy. Think about the power of love. People have sacrificed their lives to save a loved one; others, in uncontrolled passion have taken the lives of those they profess to love. Everyone is motivated by passion in some way.

If I have a death scene, I’ll reach into my dark recesses recalling the death of a family member, or a friend. Perhaps even someone I loathed. I give myself over to that moment in time digesting what I had felt. Does anger come to the forefront evoking emotions that I can’t control? If so I am experiencing passion. Maybe I want my readers to hate a character. I can search my mental library recalling some hideous act that I read about in the media. The anger and disgust start to churn, I might think how I want that person to suffer, or die. These are passionate feelings not always controlled. Are they right? Can I justify them? Do I need to?

A writer must be passionate, or otherwise they will be incapable of moving the reader to simply immerse themselves in the authors’s work. When it is forceful, we turn a page and then another. The passion that motivated the writer has touched your heart and possibly your soul.
I think it is safe to say that most people relate passion to some art form whether it is writing, music, art, or dance. Let’s focus on art for the moment. Take a Monet and place it along side of a Picasso. Now stand back and tell me what you see. Do you think one artist is more passionate about his work than the other? Not at all, yet they are total 180’s. Monet evokes soft visuals that calm, while Picasso’s audacious strokes make one want to run with the bulls. Each brush stroke brought to canvas came from passion.

“Passion is personal, but can be shared with the world”

I was a trained dancer and spent many years performing. Speaking from a personal perspective the selected music was instrumental in how passionate I danced a particular number. If I didn’t feel the music to the depth of my soul, passion escaped me. I felt blah! The passion that the musician put into his work motivated me in mine. What about opera? Although this isn’t my cuppa, aficionados can’t get enough. Rappers, Metal heads, and Country fans will stand toe to toe with you regarding their passionate choice in music. Are there right or wrongs? Never. Passion is personal, but can be shared with the world, and that in turn brings about more passion.

Why is any of this important? Without the P word, life would be gray, and each day would be humdrum. The human race becomes less human walking around in a languid state. What a horrible and dull world it would be. Politics would fly out of the window (not such a bad idea), charitable actions, caring for our fellow man, starting the day with a powerful sunrise, loving our earth, feeding the hungry, educating the poor, honoring our fallen, standing for freedom, fighting for victims rights, all gone and forgotten without passion.

We are passion in its full form. It can’t be taken away from us; we can’t trade it in on something new and better. Passion is the best and the worst of us.

http://imogenknightreikicircle.co.uk/passion-and-writing/

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Sueing Amazon

I am posting an article that I read on the news this morning that I find intriguing. As an author I am my brand, therefore I can be merchandised just like electronics or any other retail product. Since I have my books on Amazon this definitely caught my interest. I think in time some author along the way will find the right lawyer and all hell will  break loose even though a previous author wasn’t successful in a suit against a reviewer.

I’d love to hear your opinions on this article and do you think this will start a new trend?

The next time you write an online review, be careful. You might get sued.

That’s what could happen to a Florida man who left a negative review about an Internet router he purchased. According to his Tuesday post on Reddit, where he’s asking for legal advice, he received a letter from a law firm in Philadelphia threatening to sue him for an “illegal campaign to damage, discredit, defame, and libel” the company that makes the router.

“Your statements are false, defamatory, libelous, and slanderous, constitute trade libel and place Mediabridge and its products in a false light,” the verbose letter from the law firm reads in part.

In his review, which has since been edited, the man made several allegations, including that many of the positive reviews about the product on Amazon might be fake and that the router itself was “identical” to a router from a different company.

If the man doesn’t take down his review within three days, cease all Internet conversation about the product, and agrees to never buy the company’s products again, the law firm will sue him, according to the letter. But by going to Reddit and not keeping quiet, the man might have already sealed his fate.

Companies, it turns out, have every right to sue people who write reviews on websites that they may feel are libelous or defamatory.

While there is a level of legal protection that third-party websites (in this case, Amazon) have from being sued, which come from Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act—the same section that protects websites that show revenge porn—the authors of those reviews are not protected.

Neither the letter nor the user can be confirmed. Still, this isn’t the first time that someone has taken legal heat for online reviews.

In 2012, a Virginia court sided with a contractor who received a negative review from a woman on Yelp, claiming defamation. The woman who wrote the review said the service was poor and accused the contractor of stealing her jewelry. She was sued for $750,000.

In 2011, a book author sued a man, though unsuccessfully, who wrote negative reviews about his book on Amazon. And in 2006, a woman in Florida won $11.3 million in a lawsuit resulting from defamatory remarks on an Internet message board.

So while Amazon states in its terms of use that sellers “may not ask buyers to remove negative reviews,” these companies do have legal protections to go after comments they may deem libelous.

While the Internet allows users a certain amount of anonymity behind reviews on Amazon or Yelp—where a negative or positive review can determine a company’s success—there is still a danger that companies will take legal action against these reviews. For this Florida man, his gripes with this company will only grow.

Men vs. Ladies: Perspective on Characters

As a writer reading is important to me for many reasons, the sheer enjoyment of it, research and education, and keeping up with the world. My pleasure reading encompasses both male and female authors, young and those who have been around the block a few times. I never read a genre that may influence whatever I’m working on at the moment. I write fantasy and won’t even crack a book in that genre. Afraid that I might be prone to subconsciously copying a fellow author, I wait until I am far removed from my work to dive in another author’s fantasy. I do write other genres and that rule would apply as well.

As of late I have noticed the distinct difference in character presentation by male and female writers. I like both, but I started to wonder if it colored my reading process in any particular way. Clive Cussler always gives great personality traits whereas I am left a little visually challenged. Don’t get me wrong, he does provide details, and he is on the money with women’s fashion. I still somehow never get a picture in my mind’s eye 100% of how his characters look. I Like Mr. Cussler’s writing very much, and I do have to force myself to close his book, or I will be up all night. I believe the physical presentation is a gender perspective.

I also read Nora Roberts a.k.a J.D. Robb. Her characters visually jump off the page for me. I can paint a detailed picture of the characters’ attributes. By no means am I trying to take anything from either of these authors, but I am interested in asking my fellow male writers if they feel visual display is a key factor in their stories. I should be so lucky to have the success of either of these authors.

I would love to hear any feedback from either side. Is this is my viewpoint alone, or is there a gender perspective difference?

Guest Author Ken La Salle

Each week I hope to share a guest post with you from an author. This will not be a Q & A, so the writer will have carte blanche.

I’d like to thank Ken La Salle for stopping by today. Ken, as each author, will have a standing page on my blog. This designated page will offer links to his sales pages, podcasts, upcoming signings and any other related matters. Check back often for updates and I anticipate my readers may find some wonderful work to add to their collections. So without further adieu…

ken-la-salle-website-icon2As a writer, I find myself doing these more than I thought I would, introducing myself to a new audience. Everyone wants it to be fresh; no one wants other people’s leftovers.

So, I thought I would introduce myself today by talking about what brought me to writing in the first place. You see, before I committed to being a writer I was, I had been, I had craved to become an actor.

And when I use the word “crave,” I ain’t kidding. I took every crappy part I could get at first and when some of that crappy part got cut I would fight for everything I could convince the director to leave in. Like every young actor, I counted my lines. I dreamed of the day when I would run a show, by which I mean when I would be on the stage at all times.

Now, here’s a secret. Ready? I can share this secret with you now because I’m no longer an actor. I couldn’t remain an actor because, and here’s the secret, I wasn’t that good. I say it’s a secret because I know plenty of actors who thought I was fairly good. A few people thought I had real talent and wondered why I left the stage. Not a lot. But a few.

You see the key to acting, what few people really acknowledge, is that real acting isn’t. The best acting is never acted. It’s real. And the best actors can make their moments on stage real or they can experience them as real, somehow. I wasn’t ever too good at that, really. Oh sure, I had my moments. For the most part, though, I never really surrendered to the moment.

I remained aloof to the moment, floating just above the moment, observing it, gauging it – and I would try to make all of my expectations about a scene fit just the way I wanted. The problem with this approach, of course, is that I never had control over the other actors on stage. Sure, I could persuade them now and again but, mostly, I would finish my shows feeling a twinge of disappointment. And sometimes that twinge was enough to snap my neck.

But that’s the wonderful thing about writing, isn’t it? Writers can take each moment apart and dissect it like an unfortunate frog. They can put things together in any order they wish until their frog is a transforming-meka-frog… or something.

Mind you, there’s a problem with that as well. And I bring this up because I’m beginning to understand that I am leaving that point in my career, the point where striving for control is revealed to be just as inauthentic as my mistakes on the stage.

True, writers can take apart every moment, dissect it, clean it, expunge it, chop, seal, and press it… but should they? It’s a question that has been haunting me of late.

Mind you, I don’t consider myself to be a slouch. Not at all. I have some work I know I can take a great deal of pride in. My trilogy of memoirs, for instance: A Grand CanyonClimbing Maya, and The Day We Said Goodbye. My novels, from Daughter of a One-Armed Man to Vampire Society to those books I am actively marketing today and even up into the books I am just finishing. I know I’ve represented myself well.

In addition to those books, there are also my books on following your dreams, collecting my essays from Recovering the Self. There’s my podcast,So Dream SomethingMy YouTube series: My Side, Radio de’Olde, and 5 Brief Minutes. I’ve seen my work released in ebook, audiobook, and paperback. I’ve seen my plays on stages around the country. And I see no end in sight.

And yet, I begin to feel as though I’ve been stopping myself from surrendering to the moment, from relishing in it, burying myself in it waist high. Because there are some similarities between acting and writing and one truth persists: There’s a magic in the moment. Dissecting is great but there is a magic in the moment.

And so, as I move forward, my goal has become to find outlets that put me in the moment, so that I might experience that magic with my readers. I have a few experiments lined up in the coming future that I hope will throw me into the moment and help me grow as an artist.

There are things I can do as a writer that I could never do as an actor. That’s why I walked away from acting and into writing, where I’ve committed myself. Some of these things are probably obvious to anyone who has heard a writer speak, things like making that connection with the reader, finding meaning, etc. etc. etc. But I’m talking about something very different.

One of the things I can do as a writer is to experience that moment, to reach out from this side of the page and maybe touch that side of the page, maybe touch the air above the page. That, you see, is the goal of being a writer. (This is aside from having a best-seller and making a million dollars, of course. Everyone knows that is the real goal of being a writer: Not starving and having a roof over our heads!) Our goal is not to fill a page, it is to leap from it.

And that, I suppose, is my introduction. I hope you take some time to look into my work and, if you do, I will consider myself a very lucky guy. You know, writers come about an actor a dozen – and if you do the conversion:

Actors = $.10/dozen

Writers = Actors/dozen

The numbers ain’t good. This is why I feel so very fortunate to have the chance to share my stories, my moments, with you.

All the best,

Ken La Salle

Visit Ken’s page on my blog for works, signings, updates and media.

My Fellow Authors Promo Page

Passion

Passion and Writing

Do you communicate your passion in your writing? Passion in writing is the hook that draws the reader into the web of story. Here, Aron Joice, outlines how she accesses her passion and articulates it as part of her story. Enjoy!
[SendtoKindle]

Passion and Writing

by Aron Joice

Aron Joice Passion and Writing post graphicWhere does passion come from and how does it affect a writer? Passion is a gripping emotion that can allow us to discover secrets about others and ourselves. I am passionate about so many things, art, our environment, animals, children, and the elderly. Each category moves me differently, but the feelings are powerful nonetheless. Writers are solitary people facing a screen for hours on end requiring self-discipline. That discipline must come from the passion, and the necessity to write. So how do we use this as a tool to enhance our prose?

“Everyone is motivated by passion in some way”

I write fantasy. When I deal with my characters personalities and flaws I think about what motivates them. Why do they behave in a certain way? They can’t be linear, or unbelievable. Even the quietest of people have some deep-seated issues. The bottom line in my trilogy “The Lost Children of Managrail” is that love can heal, but it can also destroy. Think about the power of love. People have sacrificed their lives to save a loved one; others, in uncontrolled passion have taken the lives of those they profess to love. Everyone is motivated by passion in some way.

If I have a death scene, I’ll reach into my dark recesses recalling the death of a family member, or a friend. Perhaps even someone I loathed. I give myself over to that moment in time digesting what I had felt. Does anger come to the forefront evoking emotions that I can’t control? If so I am experiencing passion. Maybe I want my readers to hate a character. I can search my mental library recalling some hideous act that I read about in the media. The anger and disgust start to churn, I might think how I want that person to suffer, or die. These are passionate feelings not always controlled. Are they right? Can I justify them? Do I need to?

A writer must be passionate, or otherwise they will be incapable of moving the reader to simply immerse themselves in the authors’s work. When it is forceful, we turn a page and then another. The passion that motivated the writer has touched your heart and possibly your soul.
I think it is safe to say that most people relate passion to some art form whether it is writing, music, art, or dance. Let’s focus on art for the moment. Take a Monet and place it along side of a Picasso. Now stand back and tell me what you see. Do you think one artist is more passionate about his work than the other? Not at all, yet they are total 180’s. Monet evokes soft visuals that calm, while Picasso’s audacious strokes make one want to run with the bulls. Each brush stroke brought to canvas came from passion.

“Passion is personal, but can be shared with the world”

I was a trained dancer and spent many years performing. Speaking from a personal perspective the selected music was instrumental in how passionate I danced a particular number. If I didn’t feel the music to the depth of my soul, passion escaped me. I felt blah! The passion that the musician put into his work motivated me in mine. What about opera? Although this isn’t my cuppa, aficionados can’t get enough. Rappers, Metal heads, and Country fans will stand toe to toe with you regarding their passionate choice in music. Are there right or wrongs? Never. Passion is personal, but can be shared with the world, and that in turn brings about more passion.

Why is any of this important? Without the P word, life would be gray, and each day would be humdrum. The human race becomes less human walking around in a languid state. What a horrible and dull world it would be. Politics would fly out of the window (not such a bad idea), charitable actions, caring for our fellowman, starting the day with a powerful sunrise, loving our earth, feeding the hungry, educating the poor, honoring our fallen, standing for freedom, fighting for victims rights, all gone and forgotten without passion.

We are passion in its full form. It can’t be taken away from us; we can’t trade it in on something new and better. Passion is the best and the worst of us.

http://imogenknightreikicircle.co.uk/passion-and-writing/