Passion

I wrote this guest post about a year ago, and thought it was good place to revisit.

Passion and Writing

Do you communicate your passion in your writing? Passion in writing is the hook that draws the reader into the web of story. Here, Aron Joice, outlines how she accesses her passion and articulates it as part of her story. Enjoy!
[SendtoKindle]

Passion and Writing

by Aron Joice

Aron Joice Passion and Writing post graphicWhere does passion come from and how does it affect a writer? Passion is a gripping emotion that can allow us to discover secrets about others and ourselves. I am passionate about so many things, art, our environment, animals, children, and the elderly. Each category moves me differently, but the feelings are powerful nonetheless. Writers are solitary people facing a screen for hours on end requiring self-discipline. That discipline must come from the passion, and the necessity to write. So how do we use this as a tool to enhance our prose?

“Everyone is motivated by passion in some way”

I write fantasy. When I deal with my characters personalities and flaws I think about what motivates them. Why do they behave in a certain way? They can’t be linear, or unbelievable. Even the quietest of people have some deep-seated issues. The bottom line in my trilogy “The Lost Children of Managrail” is that love can heal, but it can also destroy. Think about the power of love. People have sacrificed their lives to save a loved one; others, in uncontrolled passion have taken the lives of those they profess to love. Everyone is motivated by passion in some way.

If I have a death scene, I’ll reach into my dark recesses recalling the death of a family member, or a friend. Perhaps even someone I loathed. I give myself over to that moment in time digesting what I had felt. Does anger come to the forefront evoking emotions that I can’t control? If so I am experiencing passion. Maybe I want my readers to hate a character. I can search my mental library recalling some hideous act that I read about in the media. The anger and disgust start to churn, I might think how I want that person to suffer, or die. These are passionate feelings not always controlled. Are they right? Can I justify them? Do I need to?

A writer must be passionate, or otherwise they will be incapable of moving the reader to simply immerse themselves in the authors’s work. When it is forceful, we turn a page and then another. The passion that motivated the writer has touched your heart and possibly your soul.
I think it is safe to say that most people relate passion to some art form whether it is writing, music, art, or dance. Let’s focus on art for the moment. Take a Monet and place it along side of a Picasso. Now stand back and tell me what you see. Do you think one artist is more passionate about his work than the other? Not at all, yet they are total 180’s. Monet evokes soft visuals that calm, while Picasso’s audacious strokes make one want to run with the bulls. Each brush stroke brought to canvas came from passion.

“Passion is personal, but can be shared with the world”

I was a trained dancer and spent many years performing. Speaking from a personal perspective the selected music was instrumental in how passionate I danced a particular number. If I didn’t feel the music to the depth of my soul, passion escaped me. I felt blah! The passion that the musician put into his work motivated me in mine. What about opera? Although this isn’t my cuppa, aficionados can’t get enough. Rappers, Metal heads, and Country fans will stand toe to toe with you regarding their passionate choice in music. Are there right or wrongs? Never. Passion is personal, but can be shared with the world, and that in turn brings about more passion.

Why is any of this important? Without the P word, life would be gray, and each day would be humdrum. The human race becomes less human walking around in a languid state. What a horrible and dull world it would be. Politics would fly out of the window (not such a bad idea), charitable actions, caring for our fellow man, starting the day with a powerful sunrise, loving our earth, feeding the hungry, educating the poor, honoring our fallen, standing for freedom, fighting for victims rights, all gone and forgotten without passion.

We are passion in its full form. It can’t be taken away from us; we can’t trade it in on something new and better. Passion is the best and the worst of us.

http://imogenknightreikicircle.co.uk/passion-and-writing/

Guest Author Dick Waters

Today I’d like to welcome Dick Waters, an author, and a man I admire. There is sage advice to be found in this post.

Thanks Aron for the opportunity to introduce myself to your followers.

DickMy name is Rich Waters, but I self-publish under the name Dick Waters. Self publishing is a chapter I will share later. I think you should know a little about me before I talk about my writing.

I was born many years ago in Boston. Fortunately my parents moved from the city to Wilmington, which is a small town about twenty miles north. It was a great town to grow up in and I still remain connected to many friends there and to my high school graduating class. I even dedicated one of my novels to Mr. Kelley who was a great teacher and had an even greater set of values. Looking back at those years I was shy and just an average student. English was not a subject I was fond of. I can still remember the teacher asking ‘what was Shakespeare saying in this segment?’ I often wondered why he made it so hard to interpret his words.

Maybe some of that is why I developed into an analyst. I made a living by looking at how the companies I worked for did their business processes. For some strange reason I was blessed with a way to come up with recommended improvements. This capability led to application and system design. In essence, I was considered creative. In the process my only writing involved specifications for system design and application procedures. After forty years working for other companies I started my own. However, after a costly business venture I decided to go back to work basically to secure health insurance.

A year into working for a major health industry they learned about my system background and wanted me to help with a system conversion. That was a very successful implementation, but it was followed by my having two cancers and surgery. During my recovery time I did a considerable amount of reading. I never liked to come home and crack a book as I did so much reading at work. There were three authors I migrated to – James Patterson’s Alex Cross mysteries, Robert B. Parker’s New England stories and Stuart Wood’s suspense novels.

After going back to work I realized the stress might be too much and my dad was suffering alone with Alzheimer’s disease. I decided to retire. My wife and I soon bought a house that needed considerable work and remodeling. When those projects were winding down my wife asked me to either find a job or do something to give her back her space. Well to tell the truth I didn’t want to go back to the stress connected with working and didn’t really know what to do.

After considerable thought I knew I needed to do something that utilized my former creativity. I thought about doing some ventures, but realized there was too much risk involved. Surprisingly, I thought about writing. Ten years earlier my wife and I drafted a novel, which we couldn’t get an agent to represent. That draft sat on the shelf gathering dust. I went through the rejection letters and one caught my interest. She said the novel we wrote wasn’t in the style of a mystery. Does a mystery have a style?

I wasn’t sure if writing was something I could do, but remembered the stories of the authors I liked. The one common denominator was that they all wrote short chapters and pulled at my analysis background to solve the mysteries. I read some books that addressed novel writing and in particular writing ‘Mystery’ novels. I was surprised to learn that there was indeed a cadence to a mystery novel, or the ‘style’ referred to by that agent.

Things happened fast in 2010 a year after retirement. I set out to write a new novel in the correct style. I finished the manuscript after a few revisions and an on-line search led me to an agent looking for new writers. I replied and soon sent my manuscript in reply to their interest. They said they had a publisher partner who was indeed interested in publishing it.

Hallelujah, forward progress was made. Not so fast! As we go through life we learn many things, some things are positive and some are learned the hard way by making mistakes. I learned the hard way on this one. If someone who looks like a publisher asks for money in return for services…RUN! This was a ‘Vanity Press.’ I was so new to the world of publishing that I didn’t know what to be watchful of. This one mistake cost thousands.

It took me over a year to get that first book published and finally put a halt to their more requested expenses. To end the chapter on that book – I finally retrieved my rights and self-published on Amazon. But wait…this is not the end of that horror story. Because the novel was still ‘available’ in the distribution channels, I couldn’t make it available on the Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) channel. After many requests to make it available it was finally clear of all the other channels and made available.

Serial Separation is available on Amazon KDP and is the second novel in the Scott Tucker series. Remember the earlier novel I tried to get an agent to represent? Well, I rewrote that Branded for Murder novel, which is really the first in the series. I did get something beneficial from the vanity press scenario. Kurt Bret has done four of my five novel covers, and does have a talent to capture my ideas in a design and is fortunately less expensive than I would have expected.

Cover design is now my only expense. I publish my novels first on Amazon KDP and then in print format using Amazon’s CreateSpace. In fact, the last two versions of my ‘2013 Flash Fiction Anthology’ I used Amazon’s tools to create my own covers. In hind sight I should have published in print format first and then eBook as I could not use the cover created in the eBook for the print version.

I hope some of the above is a help to other authors. So, what do I have for novels?

Branded for Murder involves Scott Tucker, who is a Harvard student, and needs to join a recently formed task force as the New England Strangler’s latest victim was his cousin.

Serial Separation sets Scott to joining another task force as the recently dismembered bodies washed up on the shores of New England were hockey players he played hockey with.

Scent of Gardenia pulls Scott into an investigation as to what is happening to rich-young men going missing on the island of Bermuda. When no ransom demands are being requested, authorities believe the men are being kept for sexual purposes.

Fragrance of Revenge once again gets Scott into an investigation where he doesn’t belong. He hasn’t learned to stay away from investigations and this one will become more than an investigation as he will become the target.

Foreplay for Murder is the same story line as Fragrance of Revenge, but is a hotter version for the adult reader.

2013 Flash Fiction Anthology is a collection of forty-one of my stories and those of Aron Joice and Brian Beam. This book reached #6 on Amazon’s Best Sellers Free list in the Short Story category.

So what can I say about the novel series? In early January I made four of the novels available for free for a four-day period and three of them made it into the top twelve on Amazon’s Best Sellers Free list in the Mystery Romance category. Branded for Murder peaked at #4 and even beat out James Patterson’s free novel. Not bad company to be in, and since I styled my novels after his Alex Cross mysteries consisting of short chapters, I guess it was a successful direction and promotion.

Following that promotional period actual sales were higher than any prior period. New, or recent authors, spend considerable time, and sometimes money, to have their product discovered by readers. I want to thank Aron for allowing me to include her short stories and samples of her novels in my anthology, and for this post.

Readers like you have a wide-choice of who you will read next. I thank those who read my novels and provide some feedback. Reviews help other readers make an informed purchasing decision. I also thank readers for any review and try to acknowledge all of them and realize I am not a great writer, but hope I tell a good story and can improve my writing skills. I enjoy writing good stories and I hope it shows.

Learn more about Dick Waters at  Amazon

My Fellow Author’s Promo page

 

Passion

Passion and Writing

Do you communicate your passion in your writing? Passion in writing is the hook that draws the reader into the web of story. Here, Aron Joice, outlines how she accesses her passion and articulates it as part of her story. Enjoy!
[SendtoKindle]

Passion and Writing

by Aron Joice

Aron Joice Passion and Writing post graphicWhere does passion come from and how does it affect a writer? Passion is a gripping emotion that can allow us to discover secrets about others and ourselves. I am passionate about so many things, art, our environment, animals, children, and the elderly. Each category moves me differently, but the feelings are powerful nonetheless. Writers are solitary people facing a screen for hours on end requiring self-discipline. That discipline must come from the passion, and the necessity to write. So how do we use this as a tool to enhance our prose?

“Everyone is motivated by passion in some way”

I write fantasy. When I deal with my characters personalities and flaws I think about what motivates them. Why do they behave in a certain way? They can’t be linear, or unbelievable. Even the quietest of people have some deep-seated issues. The bottom line in my trilogy “The Lost Children of Managrail” is that love can heal, but it can also destroy. Think about the power of love. People have sacrificed their lives to save a loved one; others, in uncontrolled passion have taken the lives of those they profess to love. Everyone is motivated by passion in some way.

If I have a death scene, I’ll reach into my dark recesses recalling the death of a family member, or a friend. Perhaps even someone I loathed. I give myself over to that moment in time digesting what I had felt. Does anger come to the forefront evoking emotions that I can’t control? If so I am experiencing passion. Maybe I want my readers to hate a character. I can search my mental library recalling some hideous act that I read about in the media. The anger and disgust start to churn, I might think how I want that person to suffer, or die. These are passionate feelings not always controlled. Are they right? Can I justify them? Do I need to?

A writer must be passionate, or otherwise they will be incapable of moving the reader to simply immerse themselves in the authors’s work. When it is forceful, we turn a page and then another. The passion that motivated the writer has touched your heart and possibly your soul.
I think it is safe to say that most people relate passion to some art form whether it is writing, music, art, or dance. Let’s focus on art for the moment. Take a Monet and place it along side of a Picasso. Now stand back and tell me what you see. Do you think one artist is more passionate about his work than the other? Not at all, yet they are total 180’s. Monet evokes soft visuals that calm, while Picasso’s audacious strokes make one want to run with the bulls. Each brush stroke brought to canvas came from passion.

“Passion is personal, but can be shared with the world”

I was a trained dancer and spent many years performing. Speaking from a personal perspective the selected music was instrumental in how passionate I danced a particular number. If I didn’t feel the music to the depth of my soul, passion escaped me. I felt blah! The passion that the musician put into his work motivated me in mine. What about opera? Although this isn’t my cuppa, aficionados can’t get enough. Rappers, Metal heads, and Country fans will stand toe to toe with you regarding their passionate choice in music. Are there right or wrongs? Never. Passion is personal, but can be shared with the world, and that in turn brings about more passion.

Why is any of this important? Without the P word, life would be gray, and each day would be humdrum. The human race becomes less human walking around in a languid state. What a horrible and dull world it would be. Politics would fly out of the window (not such a bad idea), charitable actions, caring for our fellowman, starting the day with a powerful sunrise, loving our earth, feeding the hungry, educating the poor, honoring our fallen, standing for freedom, fighting for victims rights, all gone and forgotten without passion.

We are passion in its full form. It can’t be taken away from us; we can’t trade it in on something new and better. Passion is the best and the worst of us.

http://imogenknightreikicircle.co.uk/passion-and-writing/