Cents and Sensibility

Time for an Aha moment.

I am probably going over old ground. This post isn’t for my writer friends, but I think they will approve. It is difficult to hear readers complaining about the price of books, especially when they are from indie authors. I thought I might take a minute, or two to set the record straight what all writers go through.

Let me step back a minute. I assume everyone works, or does something to generate an income to pay the bills. You know food on the table, rent, mortgage, electricity, car payments, insurance, and all those little necessities. You get compensated for putting your time in somewhere doing a job. Now writers not only have to cover the same bases, but they spend endless hours(no overtime pay here) gathering their thoughts and putting them to paper, or computer.  After, say months, or possibly a year that work is finished. Now it is ready for editing. For all you folks not in this field, let me assure you it is one of our biggest expenses. The book cover design, graphics, and typography is another big expense. Sure, you can do it on the cheap, but then that is exactly what it looks like, an unprofessional job.

Some authors advertise, have posters and banners made to shout out a new release. Oh, don’t forget all those little freebies you get from a book tour. So it is pretty simple, we have the same bills to pay on the home front as anyone else, we aren’t compensated for endless hours of writing to hopefully bring a reader enjoyment. We pull rabbits out of hats to pay our editors, and graphic designers, and that snazzy little bookmark, or iPhone cover, is not free, at least not for us.

What I am asking you, the reader, is when you see a e-book for $2.99-7.99, don’t moan and groan.  We will never recoup our investment to bring you to new worlds and adventures, unless we get very lucky. The Rowlings, Hockings, yada yada are few and far between, and kudos to them. The rest of us will keep at it not only for our pleasure, but yours.

The last thing that I humbly request is when you download a book for free, actually take the time to read it. Maybe rate it for the author, and if you feel very generous, a review. We do this for you, and with a little attention back, maybe our dreams can come true.

Book Signing For The Rising – Aron Joice

Hi everyone. If you live in or near the Binghamton, New York area please stop by and say hello at my Book signing. I would love to meet you.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Local YA Fantasy Author To Hold Book Signing

Johnson City, N.Y. June 23, 2014 Come join YA old world fantasy author Aron Joice for   her book signing at Your Home Public Library, 107 Main St., Johnson City, N.Y. July 11, 2014 from 1-4 pm. Ms. Joice will introduce her first two books in The Lost Children of Managrail Trilogy, The Rising Book 1 and Vanished Book 2.

“I am blessed to be able to share my worlds with readers both young and mature.”

The Utopian society of Managrail has lost its young king, and Queen Raina must raise their twins, the impetuous Lila, and her sullen brother Simian alone. No one could know that one of Lila’s demands will change the lands forever. Armed with magic talismans the Light Bringers, they will face challenges beyond their imaginations. Privilege won’t save them from death, nor will it save them from a journey of love and betrayal that will last two years. A magic war is on the horizon, and all the tribes will unite for one last time to stand against the Sorceress Shantra from the White Realm. With Lila’s help Shantra hopes to break free from her frozen prison of one hundred years. Little does anyone realize that the Light Bringers hold their own secret plan.

5.0 out of 5 stars This writer is on a par with J.K Rowling, January 23, 2013

Mrs Tina Britt (Wales)

I could see this book as a fantasy film for children and adults alike, and it was a pleasure to review it. Aron Joice, I believe, has a skillful imagination, on a par with writers such as Lewis Carroll (Alice in Wonderland) J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter).

Aron Joice worked in orphan relief in Eastern Europe, and spent many years in animal rescue and rehabilitation. Anyone interested in finding out more about Aron Joice can find her at www.aronjoice.com         www.facebook.com/Aronjoiceyafantasy

 

###

 

Contact: Aron Joice      aron@aronjoice.com

Cents and Sensibility

Time for an Aha moment.

I am probably going over old ground. This post isn’t for my writer friends, but I think they will approve. It is difficult to hear readers complaining about the price of books, especially when they are from indie authors. I thought I might take a minute, or two to set the record straight what all writers go through.

Let me step back a minute. I assume everyone works, or does something to generate an income to pay the bills. You know food on the table, rent, mortgage, electricity, car payments, insurance, and all those little necessities. You get compensated for putting your time in somewhere doing a job. Now writers not only have to cover the same bases, but they spend endless hours(no overtime pay here) gathering their thoughts and putting them to paper, or computer.  After, say months, or possibly a year that work is finished. Now it is ready for editing. For all you folks not in this field, let me assure you it is one of our biggest expenses. The book cover design, graphics, and typography is another big expense. Sure, you can do it on the cheap, but then that is exactly what it looks like, an unprofessional job.

Some authors advertise, have posters and banners made to shout out a new release. Oh, don’t forget all those little freebies you get from a book tour. So it is pretty simple, we have the same bills to pay on the home front as anyone else, we aren’t compensated for endless hours of writing to hopefully bring a reader enjoyment. We pull rabbits out of hats to pay our editors, and graphic designers, and that snazzy little bookmark, or iPhone cover, is not free, at least not for us.

What I am asking you, the reader, is when you see a e-book for $2.99-7.99, don’t moan and groan.  We will never recoup our investment to bring you to new worlds and adventures, unless we get very lucky. The Rowlings, Hockings, yada yada are few and far between, and kudos to them. The rest of us will keep at it not only for our pleasure, but yours.

The last thing that I humbly request is when you download a book for free, actually take the time to read it. Maybe rate it for the author, and if you feel very generous, a review. We do this for you, and with a little attention back, maybe our dreams can come true.

Guest Author Yvonne Hertzberger

Today’s guest author is Yvonne Hertzberger. We share a passion for fantasy, and I think Yvonne’s trilogy is a must read. I am so happy that she has decided to visit my blog.

authorphoto2-1

ON BECOMING

There is nothing so constant as change. Yeah, I know. That’s not new. You’ve heard it before. But this is a tale of change.

I read The Three Musketeer’s as a teenager. At the time their cry of solidarity “all for one and one for all”, when taking on a dangerous challenge, really didn’t mean a lot to me. That kind of trust was alien to me. It had no relevance to the life I lived. I grew up in an environment full of every kind of abuse and mind-bending manipulation. The idea that I could depend on another with my very life seemed like a fairy tale, a pipe dream, only for those living in a bubble of self-deception. Reality wasn’t like that.

Many years of therapy, a kind and supportive spouse, and two terrific kids have done a lot to help me get past that. But the kind of trust I was able to develop could only apply to my most intimate circle. It did not, nay, could not, extend beyond my nuclear family and a few close friends.  Sometimes even there it remained tenuous.

In 2006, I had the good fortune to be able to retire from paid work. Seven years on the phone at an incoming call centre had taken its toll on my health. Had it not been physically possible to retire, the stress would have forced the issue in other, less pleasant, ways.  At that time I was still seeing a therapist, the last of several. This guy ‘got’ me. He believed what none of the others did. He understood that I didn’t exaggerate or misrepresent how it affected me. He told me to journal. I told him I had tried that and didn’t really get anything out of it. “Well,” he said, “then just write. Write anything.”

And I did. I began with a short piece called Heartsong that basically spoke to how trapped I felt, how I dared not allow my creativity to emerge and be seen. You see, when you’ve grown up believing that nothing you do will ever be good enough, let alone good, it stays inside, like a trapped bird fluttering against its dark cage, unable to sing. You can see that little piece on my website/blog.  It’s amateurish, but I still like it for the breakthrough it represents.

That story unlocked something that had held me back. I wrote another short story, a trite little romance. I started what I thought would be another short story, a little more daring this time. And so began the trilogy called earth’s Pendulum. You see that story wouldn’t be contained. The characters wanted out, they demanded their tale be told. So I told it. It just ended with the publication of The Dreamt Child, third in the series.  But I digress.

Research told me that finding a traditional publisher would be less likely than winning a major lottery so I went the self-publishing route. I got scammed by iUniverse and lost a good deal of money I will never recoup. But that is another story. Back From Chaos came out in 2009. I could not have been more tickled with both the book and with myself. I had done it. I had written a book , all the way to the end, and seen it through to having it in my hands, proof of my efforts.

But I needed readers. I needed people other than those who already knew me to buy it and read it. Now let me be absolutely frank. I was uncomfortable with computers, eschewed social media and am an introvert. Imagine, then, what it took for me to cave in and sign up for Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. At first,  the only one I actually maintained an active presence on was LinkedIn. I tentatively joined a few discussions, fully aware that I had little to offer and that I would be wanting more than I could give back. Yet the responses were encouraging and supportive. A new world was beginning to open for me. I made a few supportive connections there. I began to stretch a bit.

Imagine my shock when in February of 2012 I received a message from K.S. Brooks inviting me to become a contributing member of Indies Unlimited. I mean, she and Stephen Hise were real authors. They knew what they were doing. I was a neophyte, not even able to stand on my own two feet yet. What could I possibly contribute?

A few emails later I let myself be convinced that I could actually add something. I didn’t really believe it, mind you, but I tried to tell that nagging little voice to shut up for a while. Just give me a chance and let me see what would happen…

That’s when the big change came. Here were a group of writers that were genuine people, folks dedicated to making the road easier for Indie authors, including me. I still don’t know if what I contribute comes close to what some of the others do. I doubt it. That’s not the point here. What I found was a growing group of friends who were willing and able to nurture this struggling, insecure author along, who treat me as an equal, who respect my input and my opinions, who answer my questions and correct my errors. All this without asking for anything back (other than a regular post). They do it without any hint that I need to do more, that I’m not “good enough”.  They don’t expect or demand perfection. I have learned to ask for what I need and that I will get it without strings attached.  I give back what I can – and it’s good enough. Meeting these folks has been a watershed moment in my life. I trust them. I love them. They are my virtual family. I will never be able to express my gratitude to them.

Since then I have ventured out and joined a few other on-line groups where I have met wonderful, supportive folks with the same attitude as my friends at IU, Book Junkies, Writers Tools to name a couple, but there are more. I have extended my presence on Facebook, with great results. And by results I don’t mean I’m selling a ton of books.  I mean I have friends – real friends, people I can count on and who can count on me.

Which brings me back to where I began. I now know what the three musketeers meant and understand their trust in each other.  “All for one and one for all” belongs in my life. I get it. I trust. I am changing.

My Fellow Author’s Promo Page

New Book Release by Ken La Salle

Update

Ken La Salle has just released

The Day We said Goodbye

Please enjoy the blurb from this emotional memoir. Visit Ken’s Promo page  My Fellow Authors Promo Page

What do you do when your father is losing his life just as you are losing your mind? Run like hell.

At the close of A Grand Canyon, Ken La Salle and his beloved Vicky drive off into the sunset. It’s a fairy tale ending, providing your idea of a fairy tale includes suicide attempts, hallucinations, and crippling self-doubt.

Now, in The Day We Said Goodbye, it’s time to live the dream. Vicky and Ken get married, travel the world, and embrace the warm light of love. Or so Ken wanted to believe. But he never really dealt with the impulses that drove him to the edge of the Grand Canyon, now manifesting in schizophrenic episodes, like when his ex-wife shows up at his wedding.

And it doesn’t help that his father is dying and Ken has to find a way to say Goodbye.

The Day We Said Goodbye is Ken La Salle’s third memoir, following A Grand Canyon and Climbing Maya. It combines razor-sharp observations with revealing wisdom and the story of how goodbyes are often all we’re left with when everything you know, and everything you think you know, fades away with time. It is a book for anyone who has lost someone, anyone losing themselves… and anyone who is lost.

The audiobook version, read by the author, is beautifully scored with the Josh Woodward song, History Repeats. (www.joshwoodward.com)

The ebook is currently a Kindle exclusive but look for it soon wherever ebooks are sold.

You can find the audiobook on Audible and wherever audiobooks are sold online.

Two trailers are available on YouTube.

You can view the first trailer here.

You can view the second trailer here.

Guest Author Laurie Boris

Today  I’d like to welcome Laurie Boris. Aside from Laurie’s many talents, she is one of those individuals who makes you comfortable right at the get go. Laurie is a true pleasure.

AuthorLaurieBoris_abnaKnowing is The First Step

A lot of writers talk about the moment they “knew” of their calling to the page. Not just the time they decided to refer to themselves as writers, perhaps a little shyly testing the waters at a gathering of friends and hoping nobody would laugh or start in with the maddening questions we are all asked: Are you published? Do you make any money at that? Do you know Oprah? No, I’m talking about that crystalline instant when it comes together in our little hearts that yes, this is what we are and this is what we do, and that we might as well give in or go crazy fighting it. Maybe for some it was winning a contest, getting a piece published, or catching the first glimpse of a debut novel in the carton that hopefully hadn’t been slashed with a boxcutter in a heated attempt to get it open.

Clues smacked me around for years before I finally admitted it to myself. Normally focused and detail-oriented, I’d missed a familiar turn on the road because I’d been daydreaming about characters and stories. Twice, I nearly burned the house down because I’d been so deep into writing that I hadn’t heard the smoke alarm. On several occasions, I’d lost sleep because the protagonist HAD to tell me something in the middle of the night. Some mornings, I’d wake up with the perfect chapter opening in my head and rush to an input device before I lost the words. And I turned into a sullen crank when I couldn’t get to the computer to play with my fictional people.

Really, I should have seen it coming.

My moment of truth came during an argument with my husband. I was sitting on the bed and he stood over me. A vein bulged in his forehead. I don’t even remember what the fight was about anymore. Just that words we would later regret spun out like Chinese throwing stars. At one point I felt like I was having an out-of-body experience. Some piece of me had floated to the ceiling and was watching us argue, noting our gestures, the body language, counting the beats of that still-throbbing vein. Our speech crafted itself into word balloons complete with the proper punctuation. I wasn’t even in the argument anymore; I was an outsider, watching and listening to two characters having it out.

A bit stunned by this, I think, I zoomed back into my body, but my responses still had end quotes and dialogue tags. Even as they came out of my mouth, a piece of my imagination was thinking, How would she look when she said that? And how would he respond to…this? Another part of my mind was editing. No. Strike the dialogue tag. Furrow the brow, clench the jaw…show, don’t tell.

Eventually we wound down and he stalked off to recoup. “That’s it,” I muttered to myself. “I’m doomed. I might as well admit my problem and research twelve-step programs.”

At that point in my journey toward writerhood, I’d won a couple of contests and had published nothing but a personal essay in a newsletter, a short story on a website, and a passel of random blog entries. The big Kahuna, however, sat in my closet: manuscripts for five novels and the hundreds of rejection slips I’d received from literary agents and publishers. Part of me didn’t want to admit that they existed: it felt like a mountain of failure.

But following that argument, I felt a sea change in how I regarded myself. Writing wasn’t a hobby. It wasn’t a creative pursuit to fill my spare time. I knew the income potential for the average writer, so I wouldn’t let myself call it a career. No. This was a calling. Okay, it wasn’t like the priesthood or anything. Charlton Heston hadn’t descended from the mountain with tablets for me, bushes weren’t burning, and Oprah wasn’t returning my calls. It felt like a quieter calling. A purpose, let’s call it.

The rejections didn’t weigh as heavily then. Some were even amusing. I stopped looking at those sneering pieces of paper as barometers of my worth and called them out for what they were: a subjective evaluation of my ability to make money for whomever I’d sent the query to. If I could learn something from an individual note, I took note. Otherwise, I decided to move on and succumb to my fate, to admit that I was powerless to control this compulsion.

Hi. I’m Laurie, and I’m a writer.

Visit Laurie’s promo page for her current works, website, and links.

My Fellow Author’s Promo Page