Cents and Sensibility

Time for an Aha moment.

I am probably going over old ground. This post isn’t for my writer friends, but I think they will approve. It is difficult to hear readers complaining about the price of books, especially when they are from indie authors. I thought I might take a minute, or two to set the record straight what all writers go through.

Let me step back a minute. I assume everyone works, or does something to generate an income to pay the bills. You know food on the table, rent, mortgage, electricity, car payments, insurance, and all those little necessities. You get compensated for putting your time in somewhere doing a job. Now writers not only have to cover the same bases, but they spend endless hours(no overtime pay here) gathering their thoughts and putting them to paper, or computer.  After, say months, or possibly a year that work is finished. Now it is ready for editing. For all you folks not in this field, let me assure you it is one of our biggest expenses. The book cover design, graphics, and typography is another big expense. Sure, you can do it on the cheap, but then that is exactly what it looks like, an unprofessional job.

Some authors advertise, have posters and banners made to shout out a new release. Oh, don’t forget all those little freebies you get from a book tour. So it is pretty simple, we have the same bills to pay on the home front as anyone else, we aren’t compensated for endless hours of writing to hopefully bring a reader enjoyment. We pull rabbits out of hats to pay our editors, and graphic designers, and that snazzy little bookmark, or iPhone cover, is not free, at least not for us.

What I am asking you, the reader, is when you see a e-book for $2.99-7.99, don’t moan and groan.  We will never recoup our investment to bring you to new worlds and adventures, unless we get very lucky. The Rowlings, Hockings, yada yada are few and far between, and kudos to them. The rest of us will keep at it not only for our pleasure, but yours.

The last thing that I humbly request is when you download a book for free, actually take the time to read it. Maybe rate it for the author, and if you feel very generous, a review. We do this for you, and with a little attention back, maybe our dreams can come true.

Book Signing For The Rising – Aron Joice

Hi everyone. If you live in or near the Binghamton, New York area please stop by and say hello at my Book signing. I would love to meet you.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Local YA Fantasy Author To Hold Book Signing

Johnson City, N.Y. June 23, 2014 Come join YA old world fantasy author Aron Joice for   her book signing at Your Home Public Library, 107 Main St., Johnson City, N.Y. July 11, 2014 from 1-4 pm. Ms. Joice will introduce her first two books in The Lost Children of Managrail Trilogy, The Rising Book 1 and Vanished Book 2.

“I am blessed to be able to share my worlds with readers both young and mature.”

The Utopian society of Managrail has lost its young king, and Queen Raina must raise their twins, the impetuous Lila, and her sullen brother Simian alone. No one could know that one of Lila’s demands will change the lands forever. Armed with magic talismans the Light Bringers, they will face challenges beyond their imaginations. Privilege won’t save them from death, nor will it save them from a journey of love and betrayal that will last two years. A magic war is on the horizon, and all the tribes will unite for one last time to stand against the Sorceress Shantra from the White Realm. With Lila’s help Shantra hopes to break free from her frozen prison of one hundred years. Little does anyone realize that the Light Bringers hold their own secret plan.

5.0 out of 5 stars This writer is on a par with J.K Rowling, January 23, 2013

Mrs Tina Britt (Wales)

I could see this book as a fantasy film for children and adults alike, and it was a pleasure to review it. Aron Joice, I believe, has a skillful imagination, on a par with writers such as Lewis Carroll (Alice in Wonderland) J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter).

Aron Joice worked in orphan relief in Eastern Europe, and spent many years in animal rescue and rehabilitation. Anyone interested in finding out more about Aron Joice can find her at www.aronjoice.com         www.facebook.com/Aronjoiceyafantasy

 

###

 

Contact: Aron Joice      aron@aronjoice.com

Cents and Sensibility

Time for an Aha moment.

I am probably going over old ground. This post isn’t for my writer friends, but I think they will approve. It is difficult to hear readers complaining about the price of books, especially when they are from indie authors. I thought I might take a minute, or two to set the record straight what all writers go through.

Let me step back a minute. I assume everyone works, or does something to generate an income to pay the bills. You know food on the table, rent, mortgage, electricity, car payments, insurance, and all those little necessities. You get compensated for putting your time in somewhere doing a job. Now writers not only have to cover the same bases, but they spend endless hours(no overtime pay here) gathering their thoughts and putting them to paper, or computer.  After, say months, or possibly a year that work is finished. Now it is ready for editing. For all you folks not in this field, let me assure you it is one of our biggest expenses. The book cover design, graphics, and typography is another big expense. Sure, you can do it on the cheap, but then that is exactly what it looks like, an unprofessional job.

Some authors advertise, have posters and banners made to shout out a new release. Oh, don’t forget all those little freebies you get from a book tour. So it is pretty simple, we have the same bills to pay on the home front as anyone else, we aren’t compensated for endless hours of writing to hopefully bring a reader enjoyment. We pull rabbits out of hats to pay our editors, and graphic designers, and that snazzy little bookmark, or iPhone cover, is not free, at least not for us.

What I am asking you, the reader, is when you see a e-book for $2.99-7.99, don’t moan and groan.  We will never recoup our investment to bring you to new worlds and adventures, unless we get very lucky. The Rowlings, Hockings, yada yada are few and far between, and kudos to them. The rest of us will keep at it not only for our pleasure, but yours.

The last thing that I humbly request is when you download a book for free, actually take the time to read it. Maybe rate it for the author, and if you feel very generous, a review. We do this for you, and with a little attention back, maybe our dreams can come true.

Guest Author Yvonne Hertzberger

Today’s guest author is Yvonne Hertzberger. We share a passion for fantasy, and I think Yvonne’s trilogy is a must read. I am so happy that she has decided to visit my blog.

authorphoto2-1

ON BECOMING

There is nothing so constant as change. Yeah, I know. That’s not new. You’ve heard it before. But this is a tale of change.

I read The Three Musketeer’s as a teenager. At the time their cry of solidarity “all for one and one for all”, when taking on a dangerous challenge, really didn’t mean a lot to me. That kind of trust was alien to me. It had no relevance to the life I lived. I grew up in an environment full of every kind of abuse and mind-bending manipulation. The idea that I could depend on another with my very life seemed like a fairy tale, a pipe dream, only for those living in a bubble of self-deception. Reality wasn’t like that.

Many years of therapy, a kind and supportive spouse, and two terrific kids have done a lot to help me get past that. But the kind of trust I was able to develop could only apply to my most intimate circle. It did not, nay, could not, extend beyond my nuclear family and a few close friends.  Sometimes even there it remained tenuous.

In 2006, I had the good fortune to be able to retire from paid work. Seven years on the phone at an incoming call centre had taken its toll on my health. Had it not been physically possible to retire, the stress would have forced the issue in other, less pleasant, ways.  At that time I was still seeing a therapist, the last of several. This guy ‘got’ me. He believed what none of the others did. He understood that I didn’t exaggerate or misrepresent how it affected me. He told me to journal. I told him I had tried that and didn’t really get anything out of it. “Well,” he said, “then just write. Write anything.”

And I did. I began with a short piece called Heartsong that basically spoke to how trapped I felt, how I dared not allow my creativity to emerge and be seen. You see, when you’ve grown up believing that nothing you do will ever be good enough, let alone good, it stays inside, like a trapped bird fluttering against its dark cage, unable to sing. You can see that little piece on my website/blog.  It’s amateurish, but I still like it for the breakthrough it represents.

That story unlocked something that had held me back. I wrote another short story, a trite little romance. I started what I thought would be another short story, a little more daring this time. And so began the trilogy called earth’s Pendulum. You see that story wouldn’t be contained. The characters wanted out, they demanded their tale be told. So I told it. It just ended with the publication of The Dreamt Child, third in the series.  But I digress.

Research told me that finding a traditional publisher would be less likely than winning a major lottery so I went the self-publishing route. I got scammed by iUniverse and lost a good deal of money I will never recoup. But that is another story. Back From Chaos came out in 2009. I could not have been more tickled with both the book and with myself. I had done it. I had written a book , all the way to the end, and seen it through to having it in my hands, proof of my efforts.

But I needed readers. I needed people other than those who already knew me to buy it and read it. Now let me be absolutely frank. I was uncomfortable with computers, eschewed social media and am an introvert. Imagine, then, what it took for me to cave in and sign up for Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. At first,  the only one I actually maintained an active presence on was LinkedIn. I tentatively joined a few discussions, fully aware that I had little to offer and that I would be wanting more than I could give back. Yet the responses were encouraging and supportive. A new world was beginning to open for me. I made a few supportive connections there. I began to stretch a bit.

Imagine my shock when in February of 2012 I received a message from K.S. Brooks inviting me to become a contributing member of Indies Unlimited. I mean, she and Stephen Hise were real authors. They knew what they were doing. I was a neophyte, not even able to stand on my own two feet yet. What could I possibly contribute?

A few emails later I let myself be convinced that I could actually add something. I didn’t really believe it, mind you, but I tried to tell that nagging little voice to shut up for a while. Just give me a chance and let me see what would happen…

That’s when the big change came. Here were a group of writers that were genuine people, folks dedicated to making the road easier for Indie authors, including me. I still don’t know if what I contribute comes close to what some of the others do. I doubt it. That’s not the point here. What I found was a growing group of friends who were willing and able to nurture this struggling, insecure author along, who treat me as an equal, who respect my input and my opinions, who answer my questions and correct my errors. All this without asking for anything back (other than a regular post). They do it without any hint that I need to do more, that I’m not “good enough”.  They don’t expect or demand perfection. I have learned to ask for what I need and that I will get it without strings attached.  I give back what I can – and it’s good enough. Meeting these folks has been a watershed moment in my life. I trust them. I love them. They are my virtual family. I will never be able to express my gratitude to them.

Since then I have ventured out and joined a few other on-line groups where I have met wonderful, supportive folks with the same attitude as my friends at IU, Book Junkies, Writers Tools to name a couple, but there are more. I have extended my presence on Facebook, with great results. And by results I don’t mean I’m selling a ton of books.  I mean I have friends – real friends, people I can count on and who can count on me.

Which brings me back to where I began. I now know what the three musketeers meant and understand their trust in each other.  “All for one and one for all” belongs in my life. I get it. I trust. I am changing.

My Fellow Author’s Promo Page

New Book Release by Ken La Salle

Update

Ken La Salle has just released

The Day We said Goodbye

Please enjoy the blurb from this emotional memoir. Visit Ken’s Promo page  My Fellow Authors Promo Page

What do you do when your father is losing his life just as you are losing your mind? Run like hell.

At the close of A Grand Canyon, Ken La Salle and his beloved Vicky drive off into the sunset. It’s a fairy tale ending, providing your idea of a fairy tale includes suicide attempts, hallucinations, and crippling self-doubt.

Now, in The Day We Said Goodbye, it’s time to live the dream. Vicky and Ken get married, travel the world, and embrace the warm light of love. Or so Ken wanted to believe. But he never really dealt with the impulses that drove him to the edge of the Grand Canyon, now manifesting in schizophrenic episodes, like when his ex-wife shows up at his wedding.

And it doesn’t help that his father is dying and Ken has to find a way to say Goodbye.

The Day We Said Goodbye is Ken La Salle’s third memoir, following A Grand Canyon and Climbing Maya. It combines razor-sharp observations with revealing wisdom and the story of how goodbyes are often all we’re left with when everything you know, and everything you think you know, fades away with time. It is a book for anyone who has lost someone, anyone losing themselves… and anyone who is lost.

The audiobook version, read by the author, is beautifully scored with the Josh Woodward song, History Repeats. (www.joshwoodward.com)

The ebook is currently a Kindle exclusive but look for it soon wherever ebooks are sold.

You can find the audiobook on Audible and wherever audiobooks are sold online.

Two trailers are available on YouTube.

You can view the first trailer here.

You can view the second trailer here.

Guest Author Laurie Boris

Today  I’d like to welcome Laurie Boris. Aside from Laurie’s many talents, she is one of those individuals who makes you comfortable right at the get go. Laurie is a true pleasure.

AuthorLaurieBoris_abnaKnowing is The First Step

A lot of writers talk about the moment they “knew” of their calling to the page. Not just the time they decided to refer to themselves as writers, perhaps a little shyly testing the waters at a gathering of friends and hoping nobody would laugh or start in with the maddening questions we are all asked: Are you published? Do you make any money at that? Do you know Oprah? No, I’m talking about that crystalline instant when it comes together in our little hearts that yes, this is what we are and this is what we do, and that we might as well give in or go crazy fighting it. Maybe for some it was winning a contest, getting a piece published, or catching the first glimpse of a debut novel in the carton that hopefully hadn’t been slashed with a boxcutter in a heated attempt to get it open.

Clues smacked me around for years before I finally admitted it to myself. Normally focused and detail-oriented, I’d missed a familiar turn on the road because I’d been daydreaming about characters and stories. Twice, I nearly burned the house down because I’d been so deep into writing that I hadn’t heard the smoke alarm. On several occasions, I’d lost sleep because the protagonist HAD to tell me something in the middle of the night. Some mornings, I’d wake up with the perfect chapter opening in my head and rush to an input device before I lost the words. And I turned into a sullen crank when I couldn’t get to the computer to play with my fictional people.

Really, I should have seen it coming.

My moment of truth came during an argument with my husband. I was sitting on the bed and he stood over me. A vein bulged in his forehead. I don’t even remember what the fight was about anymore. Just that words we would later regret spun out like Chinese throwing stars. At one point I felt like I was having an out-of-body experience. Some piece of me had floated to the ceiling and was watching us argue, noting our gestures, the body language, counting the beats of that still-throbbing vein. Our speech crafted itself into word balloons complete with the proper punctuation. I wasn’t even in the argument anymore; I was an outsider, watching and listening to two characters having it out.

A bit stunned by this, I think, I zoomed back into my body, but my responses still had end quotes and dialogue tags. Even as they came out of my mouth, a piece of my imagination was thinking, How would she look when she said that? And how would he respond to…this? Another part of my mind was editing. No. Strike the dialogue tag. Furrow the brow, clench the jaw…show, don’t tell.

Eventually we wound down and he stalked off to recoup. “That’s it,” I muttered to myself. “I’m doomed. I might as well admit my problem and research twelve-step programs.”

At that point in my journey toward writerhood, I’d won a couple of contests and had published nothing but a personal essay in a newsletter, a short story on a website, and a passel of random blog entries. The big Kahuna, however, sat in my closet: manuscripts for five novels and the hundreds of rejection slips I’d received from literary agents and publishers. Part of me didn’t want to admit that they existed: it felt like a mountain of failure.

But following that argument, I felt a sea change in how I regarded myself. Writing wasn’t a hobby. It wasn’t a creative pursuit to fill my spare time. I knew the income potential for the average writer, so I wouldn’t let myself call it a career. No. This was a calling. Okay, it wasn’t like the priesthood or anything. Charlton Heston hadn’t descended from the mountain with tablets for me, bushes weren’t burning, and Oprah wasn’t returning my calls. It felt like a quieter calling. A purpose, let’s call it.

The rejections didn’t weigh as heavily then. Some were even amusing. I stopped looking at those sneering pieces of paper as barometers of my worth and called them out for what they were: a subjective evaluation of my ability to make money for whomever I’d sent the query to. If I could learn something from an individual note, I took note. Otherwise, I decided to move on and succumb to my fate, to admit that I was powerless to control this compulsion.

Hi. I’m Laurie, and I’m a writer.

Visit Laurie’s promo page for her current works, website, and links.

My Fellow Author’s Promo Page

When Writers Are Disparaged

Often times writers feel like giving up. Why? The review that shreds your work like chum thrown to sharks, or the unkind words of a blogger can dampen ones’ spirits even if they are wrong. PW posted this today and I couldn’t feel better. Look at the company we writers keep and think again what the future holds.

The 13 Worst Reviews of Classic Books

By Bill Henderson |
Oct 26, 2012

A quarter century ago, Pushcart editor Bill Henderson put together Rotten Reviews Redux, a collection of the meanest and most scathing reviews of classic books and the writers who penned them. The vitriol returns in a 2012 edition of the book with a new introduction from Henderson. We sorted through the book to find 13 of our favorites.

“The final blow-up of what was once a remarkable, if minor, talent.” The New Yorker, 1936, on Absalom, Absalom! by William Faulkner

“Whitman is as unacquainted with art as a hog is with mathematics.” The London Critic, 1855, on Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman

“That this book is strong and that Miss Chopin has a keen knowledge of certain phrases of the feminine will not be denied. But it was not necessary for a writer of so great refinement and poetic grace to enter the overworked field of sex fiction.” Chicago Times Herald, 1899, on The Awakening by Kate Chopin

“What has never been alive cannot very well go on living. So this is a book of the season only…” New York Herald Tribune, 1925, on The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

“Here all the faults of Jane Eyre (by Charlotte Brontë) are magnified a thousand fold, and the only consolation which we have in reflecting upon it is that it will never be generally read.” -James Lorimer, North British Review, 1847, on Wuthering Heightsby Emily Brontë

“That a book like this could be written–published here–sold, presumably over the counters, leaves one questioning the ethical and moral standards…there is a place for the exploration of abnormalities that does not lie in the public domain. Any librarian surely will question this for anything but the closed shelves. Any bookseller should be very sure that he knows in advance that he is selling very literate pornography.” Kirkus Reviews, 1958, on Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

“Her work is poetry; it must be judged as poetry, and all the weaknesses of poetry are inherent in it.” New York Evening Post, 1927, on To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

“An oxymoronic combination of the tough and tender, Of Mice and Men will appeal to sentimental cynics, cynical sentimentalists…Readers less easily thrown off their trolley will still prefer Hans Andersen.” Time, 1937, on Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

“Its ethics are frankly pagan.” The Independent, 1935, on Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset Maugham

“A gloomy tale. The author tries to lighten it with humor, but unfortunately her idea of humor is almost exclusively variations on the pratfall…Neither satire nor humor is achieved.” Saturday Review of Literature, 1952, on Wise Blood by Flannery O’Connor

Middlemarch is a treasure-house of details, but it is an indifferent whole.” -Henry James, Galaxy, 1872, on Middlemarch by George Eliot

“At a conservative estimate, one million dollars will be spent by American readers for this book. They will get for their money 34 pages of permanent value. These 34 pages tell of a massacre happening in a little Spanish town in the early days of the Civil War…Mr. Hemingway: please publish the massacre scene separately, and then forget For Whom the Bell Tolls; please leave stories of the Spanish Civil War to Malraux…” Commonweal, 1940, on For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway

“Monsieur Flaubert is not a writer.” Le Figaro, 1857, on Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

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PW Daily  Tip Sheet

November entry dates for Writers’ contest and Competition

Writers’ Contests( Don’t forget October contests –check post on sidebar)

5th Annual Fiction Contest

  • Our Annual Fiction Contest accepts submissions by mail and online from June 1st through November 15th each year. The judge of the Fifth Annual Fiction Contest is Michael Cunningham, author of the novels A Home at the End of the World, Flesh and Blood, The Hours, and Specimen Days.

    Grand Prize:

    • $1,500
    • Domestic airfare (up to $500) and French Quarter accommodations to attend the next Festival in New Orleans
    • VIP All-Access Festival pass for the next Festival ($500 value)
    • Public reading at a literary panel at the next Festival
    • Publication in Louisiana Literature


    Top Ten Finalists Prize

    • Top ten finalists will receive a panel pass ($75 value) to the next Festival.


    Eligibility:

    • This contest is open only to writers who have not yet published a book of fiction. Published books include self-published books with ISBN numbers. Those who have published books in other genres besides fiction remain eligible.
    • Only previously unpublished stories will be accepted.
    • Stories that won this contest in previous years are ineligible; their authors remain eligible but must submit new work.
    • Stories submitted to this contest in previous years that did not place are eligible.
    • Stories that have won and/or placed in any other writing contest are ineligible.
    • Stories by United States and international writers are accepted.


    Guidelines:

    • A submission is one original short story, written in English, up to 7,000 words.
    • The author’s name should not appear on the manuscript.
    • Please include a separate cover page with story title and word count as well as the author’s name, address, phone, and email.
    • Submissions must be typed; pages must be numbered and single-spaced.
    • Please use standard fonts such as Times New Roman, Arial, or Georgia in 10, 11, or 12 point font size.
    • Simultaneous submissions accepted; please notify the Festival if your story is accepted elsewhere.
    • Unlimited entries per person are allowed. You must complete a separate entry payment and submission form for each entry.
    • Stories can be any theme or genre.
    • Do not include professional resumes or biographies with your entry. Entries are judged anonymously; the judges only consider manuscript quality.
    • Manuscripts will not be returned. Please do not send return envelopes with postage.


    Deadline:

    • The deadline for online and mailed submissions is November 15th (postmark).
    • Winner will be announced by March 1st.


    Entry Fee:

    • $25 per entry. Unlimited entries per person.
    • Online submissions must be paid below.
    • Submission fees are non-refundable.


    To enter online: 
    Online submissions are preferred and must be in .doc, .rtf, or PDF formats. If you are using the latest version of Microsoft Word, please save your submission as .doc and not a .docx file before sending it to us. We accept entry fees via Discover, MasterCard, and Visa only.

    To enter by mail: Send your manuscript and check or money order for [fiction-entryfee] (made out to the: Tennessee Williams Literary Festival) to:
    Fiction Contest Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival
    938 Lafayette Street, Suite 514
    New Orleans, LA 70113

    Do not send submissions by certified mail or signature required delivery.

    Have a question about one of our writing contests? Please send questions to:contests@tennesseewilliams.net

    The Edgar® Awards – Guidelines and Entry Forms

    2013 Edgar Allan Poe Awards Entry Forms (for works published in 2012) Please read submission informationfor complete information. Entry Procedure and Forms With the exception of the Robert L. Fish and Mary Higgins Clark awards, a work can be submitted to only one Edgar® committee. It is the responsibility of the publisher or producer to submit works to the appropriate committee. One copy of each eligible work must be sent to each member of the proper committee along with a copy of the submission form. In addition, only the submission form is sent to the MWA National Office. Contact the MWA National Headquarters for a list of the judges’ names and addresses: use our interactive response form . Do NOT include reviews or other promotional materials along with your entry. Do NOT contact the judges regarding this or any other submission (beyond sending the books). Contacting the judges directly might make this submission ineligible for consideration. Send the entry form (links to online forms below) to: MWA National Office 1140 Broadway, Suite 1507 New York NY 10001 A completed entry form is required for submission.

    All works submitted for consideration must meet the requirements for Active Status membership as described in the membership guidelines. While the author does not need to be a member of MWA, the work itself must make the author eligible for active status. In addition, all publishers submitting work must be on MWA’s approved publisher list or otherwise qualify to be added to that list.  If the publisher does qualify to be added to the list, they must contact the MWA national office to begin the vetting process.  All requests must be approved by the national board before the final submission deadline.  See the “Membership: Active Status” section for the details.

    You may:

    • Submit the form online
    • Mail it to the MWA National Office, 1140 Broadway, Suite 1507, New York NY 10001
    • Fax it to 212-888-8107

    Works should be submitted by the publisher, but may also be submitted by the author or agent. There is no entry fee, and no limit to the number of entries from a publisher or an individual author. Deadlines We suggest that work be submitted on the following schedule to assist the judging committee. Meeting these deadlines is not a requirement for eligibility; however, it will greatly aid the judging process. We prefer that books be submitted on a monthly basis so that the judges have enough time to read all the submissions.

    • For works published/released January 1 – March 31: Submit by March 30, 2012
    • For works published/released April 1 – June 30: Submit by June 29, 2012
    • For works published/released July 1 – September 30: Submit by September 28, 2012
    • For works published/released October 1-December 30: Submit by November 30, 2012
    • ONLY Books with a December publication date may be submitted in galleys.

    Please Note: No work will be accepted after November 30, 2012. (This does not apply to works available only in December, such as television shows. All books must be submitted by November 30, 2012) Nominations are usually announced in the middle of January (on or near Edgar Allan Poe’s birthday) of the following year and the winners are announced at the annual Edgar® Awards Banquet, which takes place in New York City in late April or early May each year.

    Albedo One
    Ireland’s Magazine of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror,
    is proud to announce
    the Seventh International Aeon Award short fiction contest:

    The Aeon Award 2012
    Grand Prize: €1000
    Second Prize: €200
    Third Prize: €100

    Plus guaranteed publication in Albedo One for the top three stories
    as chosen by our esteemed Grand Judges
    Ian Watson, Mike Resnick and Michael Carroll.

    The First Place winner will also have the option of publication
    in the Storywire section of the excellent Authorlink.com.

    Times & Dates

    The Aeon Award short fiction writing contest opens 1st January 2012, and runs for four rounds (or quarters) throughout the year. The submission deadline for the first round is March 31st, the second round June 30th, the third round September 30th and the final round November 30th. The final round is of two months duration, the rest of three months. Each round begins immediatelyafter the end of the previous round (i.e. this means you may submit at any time from 1st Jan to 30th Nov).

    At the end of each round, the best short story submissions entered in the writing competition will be chosen by a panel of interim judges, comprised of the editorial team of Albedo One and shortlisted for the Aeon Award short fiction contest. The short stories chosen for shortlisting in each round will be announced on the homepage of the Albedo One website (www.albedo1.com) shortly after the end of each round, as the writing competition proceeds. The shortlist and final results will also be printed in Albedo One magazine for all the world to see.

    At the end of the writing competition, shortly after Nov 30th 2012, the interim judges will choose the six highest-ranking stories from the competition shortlist. The top three winning stories will be chosen from these six stories by the Grand Judges. The decisions of the interim judging panel, and thereafter of the Grand Judges, are final. No correspondence can be entered into in this regard.

    Submission Format & Addresses

    Entries should be no more than 10,000 words (but there is no minimum word length) and must be typed, double spaced on one side of A4 (or U.S. equivalent) paper, and submitted by post to:

    Aeon Award
    8 Bachelor’s Walk
    Dublin 1
    Republic of Ireland

    Alternatively, entrants may submit their short stories by e-mail to fraslaw@yahoo.co.uk. Submissions must be pasted within the body of the email. Attachments can not be opened for security reasons. Submissions must also clearly have the words “Aeon Award Submission” in their subject lines to prevent mislabeling as spam.

    Receipt of email submissions will be acknowledged. If you have not received an acknowledgement three weeks after submitting by email, please send a query to this (fraslaw@hotmail.com) alternative email address (your entry may have become lost along the way). Receipt of postal submissions will also be acknowledged (if an email address is provided in the cover letter) but the timeframe for acknowledgement depends upon when we receive the entry by post.

    Multiple entries are allowed throughout the period of the competition. All short story submissions are judged anonymously by the interim and Grand Judges to ensure impartiality. You may submit any number of short stories, and have any number of short stories on the shortlist. Absolutely no prejudice is held against authors who have submitted more than one work of fiction, or with more than one shortlisted story.

    Entries are allowed from ALL nationalities. Indeed, the judges are keen to see work from as many countries as possible. However, entries must be in the English language.

    Story Rights & Conditions

    Entries to the Aeon Award short fiction contest must NOT have been previously published in ANY format in the English language (if in doubt about eligibility, please do feel free to query us). Entries found to have been previously published in English will be disqualified from the competition. Short stories previously published in languages other than English are eligible to enter the competition. This is in line with our goal of promoting writers and writing in the speculative fiction genres from as many regions of the world as possible.

    Short stories submitted to the Aeon Award writing contest in each round must NOT be submitted or published elsewhere in any format until the stories that have been chosen for the shortlist are announced on the Albedo One website after the end of each round. If your story has not been chosen for the shortlist after the round in which it was entered, you are then free to submit elsewhere.

    Short stories that are chosen for the shortlist after each round must NOT be submitted or published elsewhere until the top six stories from the shortlist have been chosen and announced on the Albedo One website (normally in December of each year). Shortlisted stories found to have been submitted or published elsewhere before the announcement of the top six shortlisted stories will be disqualified from consideration in the competition.

    Once the top six stories are announced, all other stories on the shortlist may be submitted or published elsewhere (i.e.absolutely all rights revert to the authors). Of the top six shortlisted stories, Albedo One retains the right, for a limited time, to publish these stories. Authors of these stories will be informed of whether their story will be published in Albedo One within amaximum of two months from the announcement of the top six shortlisted stories.

    Of the top three stories (which are guaranteed publication in Albedo One), these must NOT be published elsewhere until after their publication in Albedo One (i.e. rights revert to the authors upon publication – for those concerned, Albedo One and the Aeon Award short fiction contest never, ever, claim permanent rights to your stories).

    Payment Details & Options

    All stories entered in the Aeon Award short fiction contest must be accompanied by a modest entry fee of €7.50 (euro).

    Payment may be made securely and easily via the PayPal button above. Note, you do NOT need a PayPal account to use this option. PayPal accepts payment from all major credit and debit cards and is internationally recognised as a fast, easy and secure way to make online payments (see http://www.paypal.com).

    You may use PayPal to pay for entries submitted by post or email. For entries paid by PayPal, please provide either your unique Transaction Id code (which will look something like 98B96318D4186023G) OR your unique Receipt Number (which will look something like 2494-4301-2019-0796) with your cover letter (be it for postal or email submissions). These numbers are provided to you by PayPal as you complete the payment process and allow us to verify that you have indeed paid the entry fee (which we have kept as low as is feasible, to ensure that the Aeon Award writing competition is accessible to as many people as possible).

    Alternatively, for further alternative payment options (e.g. cheque, bank draft) please contact bobn@yellowbrickroad.ie

    The €7.50 entry fee may also be paid in cash enclosed in the envelope with your short story submission.

    Please be aware that we will check to see that the entry fee has been paid by one of the above means prior to reading your submission. The Aeon Award short fiction contest is intended to be open to as many people as possible, so if you have any queries or difficulties, please don’t hesitate to contact fraslaw@yahoo.co.uk and we will do our best to accomodate you.

    We understand that entry rules to fiction contests or writing competitions can be intimidating and complex, so please do feel free to contact us at fraslaw@yahoo.co.uk. But before doing so, you may find an answer to your questions at the Aeon Award writing competition FAQ.