Passion

I wrote this guest post about a year ago, and thought it was good place to revisit.

Passion and Writing

Do you communicate your passion in your writing? Passion in writing is the hook that draws the reader into the web of story. Here, Aron Joice, outlines how she accesses her passion and articulates it as part of her story. Enjoy!
[SendtoKindle]

Passion and Writing

by Aron Joice

Aron Joice Passion and Writing post graphicWhere does passion come from and how does it affect a writer? Passion is a gripping emotion that can allow us to discover secrets about others and ourselves. I am passionate about so many things, art, our environment, animals, children, and the elderly. Each category moves me differently, but the feelings are powerful nonetheless. Writers are solitary people facing a screen for hours on end requiring self-discipline. That discipline must come from the passion, and the necessity to write. So how do we use this as a tool to enhance our prose?

“Everyone is motivated by passion in some way”

I write fantasy. When I deal with my characters personalities and flaws I think about what motivates them. Why do they behave in a certain way? They can’t be linear, or unbelievable. Even the quietest of people have some deep-seated issues. The bottom line in my trilogy “The Lost Children of Managrail” is that love can heal, but it can also destroy. Think about the power of love. People have sacrificed their lives to save a loved one; others, in uncontrolled passion have taken the lives of those they profess to love. Everyone is motivated by passion in some way.

If I have a death scene, I’ll reach into my dark recesses recalling the death of a family member, or a friend. Perhaps even someone I loathed. I give myself over to that moment in time digesting what I had felt. Does anger come to the forefront evoking emotions that I can’t control? If so I am experiencing passion. Maybe I want my readers to hate a character. I can search my mental library recalling some hideous act that I read about in the media. The anger and disgust start to churn, I might think how I want that person to suffer, or die. These are passionate feelings not always controlled. Are they right? Can I justify them? Do I need to?

A writer must be passionate, or otherwise they will be incapable of moving the reader to simply immerse themselves in the authors’s work. When it is forceful, we turn a page and then another. The passion that motivated the writer has touched your heart and possibly your soul.
I think it is safe to say that most people relate passion to some art form whether it is writing, music, art, or dance. Let’s focus on art for the moment. Take a Monet and place it along side of a Picasso. Now stand back and tell me what you see. Do you think one artist is more passionate about his work than the other? Not at all, yet they are total 180’s. Monet evokes soft visuals that calm, while Picasso’s audacious strokes make one want to run with the bulls. Each brush stroke brought to canvas came from passion.

“Passion is personal, but can be shared with the world”

I was a trained dancer and spent many years performing. Speaking from a personal perspective the selected music was instrumental in how passionate I danced a particular number. If I didn’t feel the music to the depth of my soul, passion escaped me. I felt blah! The passion that the musician put into his work motivated me in mine. What about opera? Although this isn’t my cuppa, aficionados can’t get enough. Rappers, Metal heads, and Country fans will stand toe to toe with you regarding their passionate choice in music. Are there right or wrongs? Never. Passion is personal, but can be shared with the world, and that in turn brings about more passion.

Why is any of this important? Without the P word, life would be gray, and each day would be humdrum. The human race becomes less human walking around in a languid state. What a horrible and dull world it would be. Politics would fly out of the window (not such a bad idea), charitable actions, caring for our fellow man, starting the day with a powerful sunrise, loving our earth, feeding the hungry, educating the poor, honoring our fallen, standing for freedom, fighting for victims rights, all gone and forgotten without passion.

We are passion in its full form. It can’t be taken away from us; we can’t trade it in on something new and better. Passion is the best and the worst of us.

http://imogenknightreikicircle.co.uk/passion-and-writing/

Indie Authors-Where We Stand Today

I give credit to Amanda Hocking for being the spark that ignited the indie movement. Some of you may disagree, which is fine. If anyone has read her blog you know her beginning was simply work, luck, some business smarts, and not afraid to take a risk. In a manner of speaking she opened the door for the rest of us, and we have followed.

Along the way many changes happened in traditional publishing and the indie movement. Some have been good, and some well… you know the answer to that one. Amazon is growing in leaps and bounds, spreading its fingers and dipping them into many pots. Indies and self-published authors have gained respect. However, the astigmatism that we aren’t equal to traditionally published authors still remains upfront and personal in the eyes of many. We have gained a foothold and it is up to the serious to continue to deliver their best works possible. No one is sure where it will all end. I, for one, will keep trying to gain the respect of my readers and entertaining the idea of success.

And just what is success? To some it is fame, the big bucks, and to others it is the recognition that they have arrived by means of publication in any format. I am saddened when I see so much time being wasted on the finger-pointing scale. In any business there is upheaval and at times a step back to see where one can make things better. Writing is no different. After all it is a business and the writer is the brand, the end product. 2014 is likely to bring about changes that no one saw coming, and we’ll roll with the punches(sorry for the cliché). It is time to just sit down and continue to write and not worry about free books, the $.99 deal, the giveaways and the gimmicks. Yes, we need marketing tools at our disposal, but it is time we came up with a plan that brings us to the next level.

Three years ago there were 4 million writers in the USA alone looking for a publishing deal. I’m sure that number has probably doubled by now. Don’t go looking for the next big thing, no one knows what it is anyway until it smacks you in the face. Think Harry Potter, and Twilight. There was absolute no way of predicting either of these success stories. Write what you love, love what you write and I really believe success will follow. My mother used to tell me,” You can do anything , or be anything in this world that you want, I just can’t tell you how long it will take.”

 

Men vs. Ladies: Perspective on Characters

As a writer reading is important to me for many reasons, the sheer enjoyment of it, research and education, and keeping up with the world. My pleasure reading encompasses both male and female authors, young and those who have been around the block a few times. I never read a genre that may influence whatever I’m working on at the moment. I write fantasy and won’t even crack a book in that genre. Afraid that I might be prone to subconsciously copying a fellow author, I wait until I am far removed from my work to dive in another author’s fantasy. I do write other genres and that rule would apply as well.

As of late I have noticed the distinct difference in character presentation by male and female writers. I like both, but I started to wonder if it colored my reading process in any particular way. Clive Cussler always gives great personality traits whereas I am left a little visually challenged. Don’t get me wrong, he does provide details, and he is on the money with women’s fashion. I still somehow never get a picture in my mind’s eye 100% of how his characters look. I Like Mr. Cussler’s writing very much, and I do have to force myself to close his book, or I will be up all night. I believe the physical presentation is a gender perspective.

I also read Nora Roberts a.k.a J.D. Robb. Her characters visually jump off the page for me. I can paint a detailed picture of the characters’ attributes. By no means am I trying to take anything from either of these authors, but I am interested in asking my fellow male writers if they feel visual display is a key factor in their stories. I should be so lucky to have the success of either of these authors.

I would love to hear any feedback from either side. Is this is my viewpoint alone, or is there a gender perspective difference?

Listen! Announcing Ken La Salle’s AudioBook

I have been privileged to meet some fine authors along my journey and Ken La Salle is one of them. He has walked through fire and come out the other side. Below you will find a link to my original interview with Ken, do yourself a favor and read about an outstanding human being.

http://aronjoice.com/2013/04/08/ken-la-salle-interview/

Today I would like to announce Ken’s release of “Daughter of a One-Armed Man” on AudioBooks. I just love the title. Following is a snippet from the book.

Jackson is just a Wal-Mart worker from Los Angeles, far too caught up in the apathy of modern life to believe in anything. After spending one night with the daughter of a wood nymph and the man who surrendered his arm for the woman he loved, the lithesome beauty named Mari, Jackson knows he believes. And he knows he’ll do anything to find her again.

He follows her up the coast of California and a polar bear drives the taxi. Into the forest and through frozen mountains, he talks to God and creatures of faerie alike but the final confrontation is with the mother whose people have been wiped out by mankind. They were wiped out the same way humanity is wiping itself out, with greed and disregard.

Daughter is more than just a simple love story because it also poses this question for the reader: Is love really possible? Can human beings really love each other? How is it possible for parents who pollute the world they’re leaving behind to say they love their children? How can we say we look out for each other, even as we divert our eyes to the homeless we see every day? For, if love isn’t possible, how can Jackson really say he loves Mari? Faced with proof after proof that it doesn’t exist, Jackson’s only hope is to somehow prove otherwise.

The audiobook version, read by the author, is lush with impossible discoveries and words of hope for the future, beautifully scored with the Josh Woodward song, Don’t Close Your Eyes. (www.joshwoodward.com)

You can find Daughter of a One-Armed Man on Amazon, Smashwords, and wherever ebooks are sold. The audiobook is available on Audible, iTunes, and all audiobook etailers.

You can find Daughter of a One-Armed Man on Audible and wherever fine audiobooks are sold online.

http://www.audible.com/pd/Fiction/Daughter-of-a-One-Armed-Man-Audiobook/B00GTY7QQW/ref=a_search_c4_1_5_srTtl?qid=1385162705&sr=1-

Here are two trailers for Daughter of a One-Armed Man:

http://youtu.be/2ykOvVY932g

http://youtu.be/1AKpUGTj7D4

Follow Ken’s writing career at www.kenlasalle.com

On Twitter

On Facebook

And, on YouTube

 

Passion

Passion and Writing

Do you communicate your passion in your writing? Passion in writing is the hook that draws the reader into the web of story. Here, Aron Joice, outlines how she accesses her passion and articulates it as part of her story. Enjoy!
[SendtoKindle]

Passion and Writing

by Aron Joice

Aron Joice Passion and Writing post graphicWhere does passion come from and how does it affect a writer? Passion is a gripping emotion that can allow us to discover secrets about others and ourselves. I am passionate about so many things, art, our environment, animals, children, and the elderly. Each category moves me differently, but the feelings are powerful nonetheless. Writers are solitary people facing a screen for hours on end requiring self-discipline. That discipline must come from the passion, and the necessity to write. So how do we use this as a tool to enhance our prose?

“Everyone is motivated by passion in some way”

I write fantasy. When I deal with my characters personalities and flaws I think about what motivates them. Why do they behave in a certain way? They can’t be linear, or unbelievable. Even the quietest of people have some deep-seated issues. The bottom line in my trilogy “The Lost Children of Managrail” is that love can heal, but it can also destroy. Think about the power of love. People have sacrificed their lives to save a loved one; others, in uncontrolled passion have taken the lives of those they profess to love. Everyone is motivated by passion in some way.

If I have a death scene, I’ll reach into my dark recesses recalling the death of a family member, or a friend. Perhaps even someone I loathed. I give myself over to that moment in time digesting what I had felt. Does anger come to the forefront evoking emotions that I can’t control? If so I am experiencing passion. Maybe I want my readers to hate a character. I can search my mental library recalling some hideous act that I read about in the media. The anger and disgust start to churn, I might think how I want that person to suffer, or die. These are passionate feelings not always controlled. Are they right? Can I justify them? Do I need to?

A writer must be passionate, or otherwise they will be incapable of moving the reader to simply immerse themselves in the authors’s work. When it is forceful, we turn a page and then another. The passion that motivated the writer has touched your heart and possibly your soul.
I think it is safe to say that most people relate passion to some art form whether it is writing, music, art, or dance. Let’s focus on art for the moment. Take a Monet and place it along side of a Picasso. Now stand back and tell me what you see. Do you think one artist is more passionate about his work than the other? Not at all, yet they are total 180’s. Monet evokes soft visuals that calm, while Picasso’s audacious strokes make one want to run with the bulls. Each brush stroke brought to canvas came from passion.

“Passion is personal, but can be shared with the world”

I was a trained dancer and spent many years performing. Speaking from a personal perspective the selected music was instrumental in how passionate I danced a particular number. If I didn’t feel the music to the depth of my soul, passion escaped me. I felt blah! The passion that the musician put into his work motivated me in mine. What about opera? Although this isn’t my cuppa, aficionados can’t get enough. Rappers, Metal heads, and Country fans will stand toe to toe with you regarding their passionate choice in music. Are there right or wrongs? Never. Passion is personal, but can be shared with the world, and that in turn brings about more passion.

Why is any of this important? Without the P word, life would be gray, and each day would be humdrum. The human race becomes less human walking around in a languid state. What a horrible and dull world it would be. Politics would fly out of the window (not such a bad idea), charitable actions, caring for our fellowman, starting the day with a powerful sunrise, loving our earth, feeding the hungry, educating the poor, honoring our fallen, standing for freedom, fighting for victims rights, all gone and forgotten without passion.

We are passion in its full form. It can’t be taken away from us; we can’t trade it in on something new and better. Passion is the best and the worst of us.

http://imogenknightreikicircle.co.uk/passion-and-writing/